Evaluation Criteria for Paragraphs

 

The F paragraph has a significant problem with two or more of the following things: the topic sentence, the details, the organization, the grammar, or the diction.  It typically lacks a topic sentence or has a badly written topic sentence.  The body of the paragraph usually lacks order and makes little sense.  Details are frequently missing or irrelevant.  There are many grammar problems and format problems. Some of the words are badly chosen, and the tone may be inappropriate or inconsistent.

 

The D-, D, or D+ paragraph has a significant problem with one of the following things: the topic sentence, the details, the organization, the grammar, or the diction.  The D paragraph has fewer flaws than the F paragraph, but it is not communicating effectively.

 

The C or C+ paragraph has minor problems with one, two, or three of these things: the topic sentence, the details, the organization, the grammar, or the diction. It will have an acceptable topic sentence although it might be slightly unclear, broad, ungrammatical, or awkward. The support for the C paragraph is typically barely adequate and would benefit from more details or more specific and vivid details. The organization basically makes sense but may have one or two minor problems, such as a badly chosen transition or an error in chronological order.  There are probably between 8 to 15 grammatical or format errors in the paragraph.

 

The B-, B, or B+ paragraph has only a few minor problems with one of these things: the details, the organization, the grammar, or the diction. It has a good topic sentence and at least two-thirds of the support is well done.  It will have most likely some 4 to 10 grammatical or format errors. There is at least one exceptionally well-written sentence in the paragraph and at least one extremely well chosen detail. 

 

The A-, A, or A+ paragraph has an excellent thesis and strong support.  It has fewer than 5 minor grammatical or format errors.  It has good organization, appropriate diction, and clear transitions.  There may be a small problem with one or two transitions, sentences, or word choices, but the vast majority of the sentences are exceptionally well written.  Overall, the A paragraph is clear, well supported, well organized, grammatical, and has appropriate diction and an interesting variety of sentence structures and word choices.